First Weekends at the Boilerhouse in Trinity Buoy Wharf one of Londons Hidden Treasures

Trinity Buoy Wharf is an undiscovered gem. Nestled within its own little peninsula, it sits on the Thames overlooking the dominant 02 Arena and at the junction where the great river meets the meandering Bow Creek.

Even the journey to the Wharf can be one filled with unexpected wonders. A short 15 minute walk from the East India DLR it’s possible to walk along the river past the spot where some of the earliest settlers set off for America in days gone by and then into one of London’s cutest little nature reserves.

Art from Irony at the entrance to Orchard Place in Trinity Buoy Wharf

Art from Irony and Joyce Treasure at the entrance to Orchard Place in Trinity Buoy Wharf

The road leading to the Wharf, Orchard Place, is filled with community art and remnants of the areas seafaring past. The latest addition, a creation from sculptor Andrew Baldwin on a roundabout at the edge of the peninsula, being a taxi with a metal tree growing out of it’s roof. Don’t ask, no explanation should be needed, you are about to enter one of Londons most exciting if slightly unknown art destinations.

It is here where Garry Hunter has chosen to base his studio. Hunter, the author of several books including two on street art has created a bijou little workspace turned art gallery in the old Boilerhouse 1954 in the middle of the wharf. And, for every first weekend from April until October it will be opened up to the public with a different exhibition and a selection of artist books to buy each month.

Garry at his workshop and studio in Trinity Buoy Wharf

Garry at his workshop and studio in Trinity Buoy Wharf

Hunter has already liaised with a number of artists to create bespoke works around the area. They add to the Wharf’s unique vibe and features original works from the likes of James Straffon who has created a wave like creation called Time and Tide built with over 4000 nylon cable ties attached to some steel fencing.

Other public works on the entrance to the wharf include pieces from New Zealand’s Bruce Mahalski whose mural ‘Electric Soup‘ on the side of a disused building shows an underwater scene, a homage to the area’s fishing village past whilst a typically realistic portrait of a woman with hair blowing in the breeze from local street artist Irony sits nearby.

An underwater scene from Bruce Mahalski

An underwater scene from Bruce Mahalski

Once at the riverside visitors are able to enjoy views across the Thames, visit a couple of good eateries in the form of the Driftwood Cafe and the iconic and unusual Fatboys Diner and then maybe pay a visit to London’s only remaining lighthouse which is also open on the first weekend of every month. The area is also known for it’s modern looking container city and it’s links to Michael Faraday.

More public works include a number of kinetic sculptures from Andrew Baldwin, a mural from Paul Don Smith and, looking out onto the horizon towards the towers of Canary Wharf, some mushrooms from the South African born artist Christiaan Nagel.

Trinity Buoy Wharf is an interesting place.  Here is a giant fish randomly hanging

Trinity Buoy Wharf is an interesting place. Here is a giant fish randomly hanging and swaying in the breeze

Part of the joy of Trinity Buoy Wharf is, says Hunter “discovering it” and the area is still ripe for discovery. The Boilerhouse 1954 will be open every first Saturday and Sunday from April till October between 12pm and 5pm with a different exhibition featuring a series of different urban artworks and a selection of artists’ books each month. Nestled in the shadow of Canary Wharf and the dominant O2 it is truly a hidden gem with a mix of history and culture which gives the area a very special ambience indeed.

For more information on Garry Hunter and the art of Trinity Buoy Wharf try:
Time and Tide Mural – The Turnpike Art Group
Brooklyn Street Art – Bruce Mahalski Mural
Little London Observationist – Interview with Garry Hunter
Fitzrovia Noir – Community Interest Company

Trinity Buoy Wharf Gallery

Art tribute to Michael Faraday by Paul Don Smith in the Wharf

Art tribute to Michael Faraday by Paul Don Smith in the Wharf

Longplayer at Trinity Buoy Wharf the worlds longest continuous piece of music in the Lighthouse

Longplayer at Trinity Buoy Wharf the worlds longest continuous piece of music in the Lighthouse

Gee Street Art on one of the hoardings in the wharf

Gee Street Art on one of the hoardings in the wharf

The Lighthouse on the Wharf is the last remaining one in London

The Lighthouse on the Wharf is the last remaining one in London

The 02 seen from the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

The 02 seen from the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse

Fatboys Diner on Trinity Buoy Wharf

Fatboys Diner on Trinity Buoy Wharf

Click here to buy books from Garry Hunter signed copies are available at the Boilerhouse 1954 during the first weekends in Trinity Buoy Wharf

Street Art From Around The World
Urban Art – The World As a Canvas